Simran Sethi is a chocolate tasting professional, and the author of Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love.

Simran Sethi is a chocolate tasting professional, and the author of Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love.

Remember when chocolate used to be simple? It was just Nestlé and Cadbury and Hershey bars. But in recent years chocolate has become super fancy. It’s 80% dark and single origin and infused with cardamom or chilis. Artisanal chocolate is now for the masses. Or at least those willing to pay $6 for a bar.

Journalist Simran Sethi is one of those people. She has traveled the globe reporting on chocolate. Yes, that’s a job. And lucky for cocoa lovers, she’s put her findings into a podcast all about the world of craft chocolate. It’s called The Slow Melt, and from single origin to fair trade to inclusions (nuts and spices and other things added to chocolate), Sethi uncovers the hidden world of one of our favorite foods.

Check out her book, “Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love.”

Listen to the rest of the show!

This is just one segment from a whole show! Click here to explore the entire episode, including interviews with Kim Severson, food correspondent for the New York Times, and Francis Lam, the new host of The Splendid Table.

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Thanks for listening, pals! ‘Til next time…keep listening, America.

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